Adult social care services

Performance - adult social care services

Service information

For more information regarding social work services that provide care and support within the community please follow the links below.

Performance information

Latest performance results for are summarised below and a key showing the symbols is included at the bottom of this page.

Home support

Home care is one of the most important services available to local authorities to support people with community care needs to remain at home.  Our home support service provides support across all age ranges.  The largest volume of provision is to people aged 65 and over, more than 15% of North Lanarkshire's population fall within this age range. 

The following indicator shows the number of adults age 65+ receiving personal care at home as a percentage of the total number of adults needing long-term care.

IndicatorActual 2010/11Actual 2011/12Actual 2012/13Actual 2013/14Actual 2014/15Actual 2015/16Actual 2016/17Actual 2017/18
Home care - % of people aged 65+ with long-term care needs receiving personal care at home62.9%63.9%65.3%66.0%69.2%70.0%71.3%70.1%
Scotland comparisons58.9%59.2%59.8%59.8%60.0%60.7%60.1%61.7%
Family group comparisons61.5%62.7%62.7%62.3%63.2%64.5%64.9%65.9%
  • The percentage of people with long-term care needs receiving personal care at home within North Lanarkshire has shown a year on year increases in the figures, dropping only slightly in 2017/18 to 70.1%.  Figures remain higher than national (61.7%) and family group averages (65.9%).
  • This is a positive picture for North Lanarkshire with the third highest figures in Scotland; it shows the extent to which services have been developed and are continuing to support people to live as independently as possible. 
  • Broad national trends show a large variation across councils, with figures ranging from 42.6% to 73.7%, analysis shows that generally councils with larger populations have lower rates of people receiving personal care at home than smaller areas (58% compared to 69%).

The provision of assistive technology helps to enable people to remain at home for longer. This includes a range of electronic sensors and monitors, such as pressure mats, fall detectors, and bed monitors.  This measures the number of residents in receipt of assistive technology.

IndicatorIdeal directionActual 2012/13Actual 2013/14Actual 2014/15Actual 2015/16Actual 2016/17Actual 2017/18Actual 2018/19Target 2018/19Progress status
Assistive technology - number of people with assistive technologyPerformance arrow - up 8599341,0871,1361,3661,3991,4681,452

Performance status - green

  • We helped 1,468 service users to remain in their own homes following the provision of assistive technology; this is an increase from 1,399 last year and is below our target for the year of 1,452.

The provision of equipment and adaptations helps enable people to remain at home for longer and assists then with their day to day living.  This equipment varies from small items to assist with eating and operating taps to larger items such as stair lifts and bathing equipment.  This indicator measures the number of deliveries made within 7 days.

IndicatorIdeal directionActual 2012/13Actual 2013/14Actual 2014/15Actual 2015/16Actual 2016/17Actual 2017/18Actual 2018/19Target 2018/19Progress status
Integrated equipment and adaptations service - proportion of deliveries achieved within 7 daysPerformance arrow - up 84.2%81.5%80.5%77.9%82.2%77.8%78.7%80%Performance status - green
  • During the year 78.7% of equipment (34,696 out of 44,102 items) was delivered within 7 working days.  This is a smaller figure to last year (77.8%) where there was a higher volume of equipment delivered (37,785 out of 48,551 items).

Reablement is a short and intensive service, usually delivered in the home, which is offered to people with disabilities and those who are frail or recovering from an illness or injury.  The purpose of reablement is to help people who have experienced deterioration in their health, and/or have increased support, to relearn the skills required to keep them safe and independent at home.  People using reablement experience greater improvements in physical functioning and an improved quality of life compared with using standard home care.  This indicator shows the extent of reablement provision in place across North Lanarkshire.

IndicatorIdeal directionActual 2013/14Actual 2014/15Actual 2015/16Actual 2016/17Actual 2017/18Actual 2018/19Target 2018/19Progress status
Reablement process - number of people completing the reablement processPerformance arrow - up 9961,0661,5331,7041,8041,9842,000

Performance status - green

  • 1,984 people completed the reablement process during 2018/19; this is a higher figure than last year.

Home care costs

The following indicator measures the cost of home care for older people (age 65+).  Home care is delivered in the service user's own home (including sheltered housing) and may include personal care, domestic help, laundry services, shopping services, and care attendant schemes.

Council spending on home care services has been standardised around home care costs per hour to enable comparisons across councils.

IndicatorActual 2010/11Actual 2011/12Actual 2012/13Actual 2013/14Actual 2014/15Actual 2015/16Actual 2016/17Actual 2017/18
total home care expenditure (£000)£23,853£22,791£24,531£26,282£29,655£31,556£37,196£40,091
number of care hours per year1,272,3101,202,8251,239,4071,384,8251,491,9971,460,1341,444,2091,422,096
Home care - cost per hour for people aged 65 or over£18.75£18.95£19.79£18.98£19.88£21.61£25.76£28.19
Scotland comparisons£20.14£19.77£20.47£20.25£20.24£21.19£22.64£23.76
Family group comparisons£20.93£19.43£20.49£20.15£19.06£21.23£24.08£26.09
  • North Lanarkshire's costs for 2017/18 (£28.19) show a year on year increase in line with expenditure and the number of care hours delivered each year.  Figures are higher than the average for Scotland (£23.76) and the family group (£26.09).
  • Across councils in Scotland the average spend per hour ranged from £13.28 to £46.76 with broad national trends showing less of a connection between costs per hour and the rural nature of the council this year than in previous years.  Over time the average cost for rural councils has reduced with costs in urban councils increasing.
  • Nationally, the increase in expenditure reflects in part the commitment from October 2016 to pay all social care workers the living wage.  this, and a new home support framework will have had an impact on the cost figures for North Lanarkshire.

Self directed support (direct payments)

The following indicator calculates the cost of direct payments spend on adults age 18+ as a proportion of the total social work spend on adults (age 18+).

Self directed support involves a range of options for how social care is delivered, empowering people to decide how much ongoing control and responsibility they want over their own support arrangements.  Self directed support has four options - direct payment (a cash payment), the budget is allocated to a provider the person chooses, the local authority arranges the support, or a mix of these options.

However, at present this indicator only measures one of these options, i.e. direct payments, and as a result does not demonstrate the extent to which councils have implemented self directed support through the other options, which for some councils may be more prevalent.

The Society of Local Authority Chief Executives and Senior Managers (SOLACE), Association of Directors of Social Work (ADSW), and the Improvement Service will do further work to improve this indicator to develop the breakdown of spend information available across the four options for use within the LGBF.

IndicatorActual 2011/12Actual 2012/13Actual 2013/14Actual 2014/15Actual 2015/16Actual 2016/17Actual 2017/18
self directed support spend on direct payments for adults age 18+ (£000)£1,889£2,391£2,726£3,544£3,620£3,653£4,218
gross social work spend on adults age 18+ (£000)£145,353£140,563£140,386£148,833£155,791£171,144£178,319
Self-directed support (SDS) - SDS spend on adults age 18+ as a % of total social work spend on adults age 18+1.3%1.7%1.9%2.4%2.3%2.1%2.4%
Scotland comparisons2.9%6.0%6.4%6.9%6.7%6.4%6.7%
Family group comparisons4.5%13.4%14.0%14.4%12.4%9.0%9.9%
  • North Lanarkshire's spend on self directed support spend on direct payments for adults age 18+ accounts for 2.4% of overall gross social work spend on adults age 18+.  Within North Lanarkshire, self directed support spend on direct payments has increased by almost over 85% over the six years from 2011/12 to 2017/18.
  • However, care should be taken when interpreting the results for this indicator as it measures only one element of self directed support, i.e. direct payments. 
  • While North Lanarkshire's figures are lower than the average for Scotland and our family group, these comparisons are heavily skewed with figures for Glasgow City Council showing significant growth over the period as they were one of the early adopter of self directed support, having re-assessed all young adult clients.  In addition, the extent to which other councils have implemented any one of the four payment options more than the other is not known and further information on each council's delivery model would be required before appropriate comparisons can be made.
  • Within North Lanarkshire self-directed support has mainly focussed on younger adults; as part of the new home support model there will be more choice and control for older adults, and in future more individuals will manage for own personal budgets for their support.

Residential care

The following indicator shows the net cost of residential care per adult (age 65+) per week.

Costs refer to net expenditure on care homes, including both free personal care and free nursing care for adults over 65, but does not include other accommodation based services (i.e. non respite).

The number of older adults in residential care refers to the total number of long-term residents in care homes.

IndicatorActual 2010/11Actual 2011/12Actual 2012/13Actual 2013/14Actual 2014/15Actual 2015/16Actual 2016/17Actual 2017/18
net expenditure on care homes for older people (£000)£41,202£36,022£27,894£27,723£27,350£26,491£29,595£29,640
number of long stay residents age 65+ supported in care homes1,4001,3601,3201,3601,2901,2901,2801,300
Residential care - cost per week per resident for people aged 65 or over£566£509£406£392£408£395£445£438
Scotland comparisons£388£398£370£363£371£365£372£372
Family group comparisons£430£429£388£359£384£379£386£376
  • Within North Lanarkshire, the net expenditure on residential care services per older adults (age 65+) per week shows a 22.5% decrease from 2010/11 to 2017/18.  This is represented by a 28% decrease on expenditure in care homes and a 7.1% decrease in the number of long-stay residents.
  • Across councils in Scotland the average cost ranged from £195 to £1,349 with island and rural councils reporting higher costs on average.
  • Looking at this indicator in context, North Lanarkshire has one of the lowest proportions of older people in care homes in Scotland, reflecting the development of support in the community such as reablement, integrated day services, and intermediate care services.  People who need to go into a care home tend to have more intensive and complex needs.

Satisfaction with social care or social work services

The data for these indicators is taken from the Scottish Health and Care Experience Survey (formerly the GP and Local NHS services survey).

These indicators measure user satisfaction with social care services and the perceived impact this care has on the outcomes experienced.

IndicatorActual 2014/15Actual 2015/16Actual 2017/18
Satisfaction - % of adults receiving any care or support who rate it as excellent or good83.0%78.3%75.4%
Scotland comparisons84.0%81.0%80.2%
Family group comparisons85.4%83.0%80.6%
IndicatorActual 2014/15Actual 2015/16Actual 2017/18
Satisfaction - % of adults supported at home who agree that their services and support had an impact in improving or maintaining their quality of life86.6%85.9%75.6%
Scotland comparisons85.0%84.0%80.0%
Family group comparisons86.7%86.4%78.3%
  • The latest figures in North Lanarkshire for both of the above indicators show a level of satisfaction slightly lower than national and family group comparisons. 
  • Trends in North Lanarkshire figures over the three years are on a par with the national and family group average figures.
  • Across councils in Scotland satisfaction of adults receiving any care or support who rate it as excellent or good ranges from 71% to 94% with those who agree their support has an impact ranging from 71% to 97%.
  • These figures come from a survey which takes place every two years and only three years of data is currently available so further trend analysis is limited. 
  • In addition, a change in methodology in the Health and Care Experience Survey (on which this indicator is based) in 2017/18 has resulted in a drop for most local authorities in Scotland.

All of the above information contains a subset of North Lanarkshire's performance in terms of our adult health and social care services; this represents those performance measures that can be compared across all council areas in Scotland through the Local Government Benchmarking Framework (LGBF)

Further performance information can be obtained from the Chief Social Work Officer's annual report.

The above makes reference to our family group, the council areas with whom our performance is most comparable in terms of where social context is known to influence key factors in performance.

Our family group comprises eight council areas that have the highest proportion of areas of deprivation (according to the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD)).  These are are Dundee City Council, East Ayrshire Council, North Ayrshire Council, Inverclyde Council, West Dunbartonshire Council, Glasgow City Council, Western Isles Council, and North Lanarkshire Council.

What this being done to improve services

Work is ongoing to ensure the continued development of our services. 

Further information is available from the North Lanarkshire Health and Social Care Integration website.

How the public can get involved

Further information

Local councils provide a wide range of services for their communities; the online data tool, My Local Council, provides further information and comparisons on these services to show how councils across Scotland are performing.

Key to symbols
Ideal directionProgress status
The ideal direction of an indicator is the way we aim to see performance results change over time.  The two options are as follows:We assess the progress of each of our indicators by comparing the latest performance results to target.  The traffic light system used to assess progress is noted below:
Performance arrow - up
  • high figures are good for this indicator
  • we aim to see an upward trend
Performance status - green
  • performance is on target and/or within the acceptable thresholds
Performance arrow - down
  • low figures are good for this indicator
  • we aim to see a downward trend
Performance status - red
  • performance does not meet the target set and is outwith the acceptable thresholds
  Performance status - blue
  • performance surpasses the target and exceeds expectations

For any queries, or further details regarding the performance information on this page, please contact the Business Solutions team.

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